Vlog/Blog

Thoughts and ideas from Platinum Senior Solutions
Frequently asked questions
What would you like to know?

Still have questions? We've got answers. Email us or give us a call.

  • What is PAC training?

    In-depth experiential training includes feedback loops for the purpose of creating new habits and practices in care partnering. Skill and Competence training programs include a focus on communication, care provision behaviors, and environmental and programming support for in home, community, facility, or agency based models.

  • What is CARES® ?

    CARES® Dementia Basics™ focuses on person-centered care, the changes that happen to thinking skills as dementia progresses, how those changes impact behavior, and how to understand behavior as communication. It also includes CARES® Approach training, a person-centered, easy-to-remember approach to care for any person in any situation and at any level of dementia thinking decline.

  • What is Essentialz Certification?

    Applicants become essentiALZ-certified by completing dementia care training and the Alzheimer’s Association essentiALZ online certification exam, which focuses on basic dementia care practices. 

  • What is a Certified Dementia Practitioner (CDP)?

    Certified Dementia Practitioners are health care professionals, front line staff and First Responders who qualify for CDP certification and are interested in learning comprehensive dementia education, who value dementia education, who are committed to ending abuse and neglect and who work in the following health care settings, nursing homes, assisted living, adult day care, hospitals, hospice and home care setting, home care agency, Life Plan Communities, Independent Living Communities, etc.

  • Who is the National Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners (NCCDP)?

    The National Council of Certified Dementia Practitioners®, LLC was formed in 2001 by a group of professionals with varying work and personal experiences in the field of dementia care. The Council was formed to promote standards of excellence in dementia and Alzheimer's education to professionals and other caregivers who provide services to dementia clients.

  • What is a CARES® Dementia Specialist?

    Individuals must complete the CARES® Dementia Basics™, become essentiALZ-certified and score 90% or above on the Alzheimer’s Association final exam to qualify for CARES® Dementia Specialist.

  • Who is Teepa Snow?

    Teepa Snow’s comprehensive approach to dementia care has made her highly respected among the leading professional organizations including The Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s Foundation of America and the US Dementia Action Alliance to name just a few.

    She first developed her Positive Physical Approach technique early in her practice career and introduced it to others in continuing education workshops for nursing in the late 1980s. In the 1990s, she also began to advocate the use of Hand-under-Hand® assistance following her work in traumatic brain injury programs and nursing home settings. By the early 2000s, Teepa was working with Melanie Bunn and Maureen Charlton at the local Alzheimers Association to provide knowledge and skill based intensive workshops across the region.

    It is Teepa's mission to help families and professionals better understand how it feels to be living with dementia and related challenges. Teepa's philosophy for living well with dementia focuses on the interpersonal dynamics of coping with a changing brain and is reflective of her diverse education, work experience, medical research, and first-hand caregiving experiences. Read more at teepasnow.com

  • What is so special about Platinum Senior Solutions?

    Our approach is unique in the industry - we only provide Dementia Care! 

     The cornerstones of our care are: communication, education, training and awareness. 

  • What is the Virtual Dementia Tour?

    Virtual Dementia Tour (VDT), the original, ground-breaking, evidence-based, and scientifically proven method of building a greater understanding of dementia. The VDT uses patented sensory tools and instruction based on research conducted by P.K. Beville, M.S., a specialist in geriatrics and the founder of Second Wind Dreams®. During a Virtual Dementia Tour experience, trained facilitators guide participants outfitted with patented devices that alter their senses while they try to complete common everyday tasks and exercises. The Tour enables caregivers to experience for themselves the physical and mental challenges those with dementia face, and use the experience to provide better person-centered care.

  • What is a Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA)?

    A certified nursing assistant, or CNA, helps patients with activities of daily living and other healthcare needs under the direct supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). CNA's are also commonly referred to as a Nursing Assistant, Patient Care Assistant (PCA), or a Nurse's Aid.

  • What is a Medication Aide (MA)?

    A Certified Medication Aide is a certified nursing assistant (CNA) responsible for administering daily medication to patients in a hospital or medical facility. Also referred to as Medical Aide Technicians, their duties include monitoring patients, reporting changes, and collecting samples.

  • What is a Restorative Nurse Aide (RNA)?

    A restorative nurse's aide is a certified nursing assistant (CNA) who has additional, specialized training in restorative nursing care. A restorative nurse's aide (RNA) helps patients gain an improved quality of life by increasing their level of strength and mobility.

  • What is a Physical Therapy Aide (PTA)?

    Physical therapist aides often do tasks that are indirectly related to patient care, such as cleaning and setting up the treatment area, moving patients, and performing clerical duties.

  • What is Medical Assistant (MA)?

    A Medical Assistant, also known as a "Clinical Assistant" or healthcare assistant is an allied health professional who supports the work of physicians and other health professionals, usually in a clinic setting.

  • Do you have a blog?

    Yes we do! Click the link

  • What forms of payment do you accept?

    We accept all major credit cards.

  • What's the best way to get in touch with you?

    We'd love to hear from you. Feel free to reach out via our contact form or give us a call. We will try to get back to you in less than 24 hours.

  • Where are you located?

    We are proudly located in Pearland.

  • When are you available?

    Check our business hours on the contact page. If you ever have a question outside of these hours, don't hesitate to reach out!

Videos and Podcasts
Come back from time to time to see what we have added.

Becoming Dementia Aware Starts With Learning. 

“Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.” —Maya Aangelou

  • Caregiver Break Caregiving is demanding — and it’s normal to need a break. Seeking help does not make you a failure. Remember that respite services benefit the person with dementia as well as the caregiver.
    June 30, 2019 at 5:00 AM

    Everyone needs a break. Respite care provides caregivers a temporary rest from caregiving, while the person with Alzheimer’s continues to receive care in a safe environment. Using respite services can support and strengthen your ability to be a caregiver.

    Caregiving is demanding — and it’s normal to need a break. Seeking help does not make you a failure. Remember that respite services benefit the person with dementia as well as the caregiver.

    Using respite care

    Caregiving is demanding — and it’s normal to need a break. Seeking help does not make you a failure. Remember that respite services benefit the person with dementia as well as the caregiver.

    Respite care can help you as a caregiver by providing a new environment or time to relax. It’s a good way for you to take time for yourself.

    Respite care can provide:

    • A chance to spend time with other friends and family, or to just relax

    • Time to take care of errands such as shopping, exercising, getting a haircut or going to the doctor

    • Comfort and peace of mind knowing that the person with dementia is spending time with another caring individual

    • 

    Respite care services can give the person with dementia an opportunity to:

    • Interact with others having similar experiences

    • Spend time in a safe, supportive environment

    • Participate in activities designed to match personal abilities and need

    Coordinate your helpers

    Build your care team, share tasks and coordinate helpers

    Respite care can be provided at home — by a friend, other family member, volunteer or paid service — or in a care setting, such as adult day care or residential facility.

    In-home care services offer a range of options including:

    • Companion services to the individual with companionship and supervised activities

    • Personal care or home health aide services to provide assistance with bathing, dressing, toileting and exercising

    • Homemaker or maid services to help with laundry, shopping and preparing meals

    • Skilled care services to help with medication and other medical services

    Adult day centers offer a place where the person with Alzheimer’s can be with others in a safe environment. Staff leads planned activities, such as music and art programs. Transportation and meals are often provided.

    Residential facilities may offer the option for a stay overnight, for a few days or a few weeks. Overnight care allows caregivers to take an extended break or vacation while the person with dementia stays in a supervised, safe environment. The cost for these services varies and is usually not covered by insurance or Medicare.

    Tip: Sometimes, a person with dementia may have difficulty adjusting to a new environment. Regular stays can allow the overall adjustment to become easier.

  • 44ff7d5d-f660-49d5-bfb0-c7113d00d1fe.png
    Something Seems ”Off”
    June 23, 2019 at 5:00 AM

    Changes in personal appearance and household cleanliness typically are indications of a shift in physical and/or mental status. Even subtle changes may imply that an individual is no longer capable of completing simple tasks without support. 

    Maybe you’ve noticed that unopened mail is piling up or that once meticulously dressed Mom is wearing wrinkled clothes and not doing her hair. These are just two real-life examples of the many signs that an individual’s daily living skills are in decline.

    It is often apparent upon arrival at a loved one’s home that things have gone awry. 

    Household chores can become challenging for a number of reasons, but when upkeep has stopped to the point of unsanitary conditions and in necessary clutter, it is a clear warning that outside help may be necessary. 

    Other signs include weight loss, forgetting to take medications, and unexplained bruising that often points to changes in mobility.

    Deviation from established daily and personal hygiene routines is one of the most common red flags that family members observe. Although seniors may not bathe as frequently as they did when they were younger, a strong smell of urine or body odor or refusal to change out of dirty clothes, indicate it is time to step in. 

    A noticeable decline in grooming habits and personal care is a sure sign that a senior is struggling. If you are noticing these or other obvious signs of a change in your loved one’s abilities it might just be time to call in some help!

  • d100c5ef-158f-410f-bb76-e5aa7bd026d7.jpeg
    Fateher’s Day Poem Missing all the Dads who are ”gone” yet still here.
    June 16, 2019 at 5:00 AM
  • 98ac258b-fec1-443e-8d7f-424db240d945.jpeg
    Let’s Start a Revolution! It is expected an estimated 10 million baby boomers will develop Alzheimer's. Of those who reach the age of 85, nearly one in two will get it.
    June 9, 2019 at 5:00 AM

    Over 35 million people in the world have dementia. Alzheimer’s Disease International projects that this number will nearly double every 20 years. With dementia cases on the rise worldwide, the importance of early intervention and community understanding of dementia has never been greater. One (1) person every three (3) seconds is diagnosed with a dementia-related disease. In the United States someone is diagnosed every 65 seconds and that timeline is shrinking. The numbers are unsettling but real. 

    Time for a change, time for a revolution! We must do something! We could take a lesson from attached article (The Importance of Building Dementia-Friendly Communities) and follow in the footsteps of towns already on the move. We could start with Demetia friendly coffee shops and restaurants and then move into the bigger picture of entire cities. 

    From the Blog at Alzheimers.net

    The Importance of Building Dementia-Friendly Communities

    October 31, 2016 Dementia Jennifer Wegerer 

    A new study from Britain reveals that one-third of people with dementia feel let down by their local communities.

    However, by transforming themselves into dementia-friendly communities, cities and towns can help dementia sufferers feel less like a burden and more a part of local life.

    How Dementia-Friendly Communities Make a Difference

    An unfortunate trend, more and more dementia sufferers feel trapped in their own homes.

    According to research from the Alzheimer’s Society, 35% of people with dementia leave their homes once a week. What’s more, about 10% go out only once a month.

    People with dementia stay home because they feel like a burden to their communities. In turn, they become less independent, and their quality of life suffers. This leads to more and more health issues that land them in care facilities.

    Over 35 million people in the world have dementia. Alzheimer’s Disease International projects that this number will nearly double every 20 years. With dementia cases on the rise worldwide, the importance of early intervention and community understanding of dementia has never been greater.

    In an effort to help people with dementia feel more included, cities and towns are transitioning to dementia-friendly communities.

    Essentially, these communities make a promise through words and actions to understand, respect and support the unique needs of people with dementia. The hope is that these individuals will feel more a part of their community and contribute more of their unique talents and skills.

    Bruges, Belgium

    As an example of what dementia-friendly communities can do, Bruges, Belgium, maintains a database of people with dementia in case one of them goes missing. They also have a local choir made up of people with dementia. Many stores have trained their employees to deal with dementia patients and display signs letting customers know the store is dementia-friendly.

    Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota

    Comprised of community groups and individuals, Minnesota’s ACT on Alzheimer’s organization aims to make communities more dementia-friendly. It’s developed an online toolkit to help towns assess problems that dementia residents face and devise solutions. This could mean better training for sales people or drivers of public transportation. It could also mean educating police and first-responders. Overall, the goal is to raise awareness of dementia and diminish the stigma of this disease.

    How to Build a Dementia-Friendly Community

    How Communities and Individuals Can Help

    Building a dementia-friendly community takes collaboration, investment and time. It involves health services, social services, law enforcement, local government, charities and volunteer groups. It also involves individuals listening, showing respect and offering a helping hand. As efforts in Bruges and the Twin Cities show, it can be done.

    Even small steps, such as training store employees to be more tolerant or bus drivers to recognize passengers with dementia, can make a difference. Public or self-education on the unique needs of dementia residents can impart a better understanding of the symptoms and diminish the stigma associated with this disease.

    Each of these steps can build into broader community efforts.

    Lowering All-Around Costs

    Enhancing quality of life for the ever-expanding population of adults with dementia can lower costs for the community as a whole. In the U.S., costs for Alzheimer’s patients are high, but the costs aren’t just monetary.

    Having that community support in place for dementia patients can be therapeutic in and of itself. They’ll feel welcomed, listened to and respected, which can improve their overall health. That helps stave off or prevent health issues or the need for long-term care.

    It also inspires people with dementia to remain a part of the life around them, and their contribution benefits us all.

    Has your community made efforts to become dementia-friendly? Share your stories and tips with us in the comments below.

  • Generation Alzheimer’s
    June 2, 2019 at 12:00 AM

    According to estimates 10 million baby boomers will develop Alzheimer’s. Of the ones who reach age 85, nearly 50% will have Alzheimer’s or take care of someone with dementia related illness. 

    Because there is no cure, no way to prevent it, not even a known way to slow its progression, 10 million baby boomers will either die with Alzheimer’sSpouses lose their lifetime partner and for their children, the tragedy is the loss of parents and grandparents. Family security is destroyed and millions of dollars are depleted every year stressing family (and government) finances.

    According to several recent reports, Alzheimer’s will be the defining disease for us Boomers. As a matter of fact, 5.3 million Americans already have Alzheimer’s disease and it’s only going to get worse — and fast.heimer’s or from.

    No one recovers from Alzheimer’s. It is progressive. It eventually takes everything away. Alzheimer’s steals memories, judgment, and independence.

    Spouses lose their lifetime partner and for their children, the tragedy is the loss of parents and grandparents. Family security is destroyed and millions of dollars are depleted every year stressing family (and government) finances.

    According to several recent reports, Alzheimer’s will be the defining disease for us Boomers. As a matter of fact, 5.3 million Americans already have Alzheimer’s disease and it’s only going to get worse — and fast.